Nutrition and Physical Degeneration Book Review

Nutrition and Physical Degeneration

Weston A. Price

So many of my foodie and health nut friends talk about this book, as well as the cookbook Nourishing Traditions by Sally Fallon, that I decided I had to read them, so I could intelligently participate in the conversations.  I honestly thought I already knew most of what would be in the book, and started to read it as an obligatory task.  I was wrong.  If everyone would take Dr. Price’s ideas to heart, our world would likely have far less degenerative disease.  

nutrition and physical degenerationDr. Price was a dentist in the early 1900’s, who traveled the world looking at people’s teeth, diet, and health.  He examined a wide range of primitive cultures to include the Inuit, American Indians, African, Latin Americans, Pacific Islanders, and Australians.  He correlated the diet of these cultures with their appearance, teeth, and general health.  He found that primitive cultures who ate their traditional diet, which most often included fatty meats, organs, fermented foods, and often raw foods, had great teeth.  This was true even though they didn’t have any of the modern dental hygiene products or modern dentistry we depend on.  They had straight teeth, high cheekbones, strong jaws, well developed noses and sinuses, and almost no cavities.  They also were quite attractive.  They almost never had problems like heart disease, diabetes, arthritis, and other degenerative problems.  The people grew into old age strong and healthy, with all their teeth.  The book is full of pictures of smiling people from all over the world, with beautiful faces and amazing teeth.  These pictures were compared to cultures who had given up their traditional foods, and the differences were sobering.

When these cultures were touched by “modern” (as modern as the early 1900’s) foods, their teeth and general health declined quickly.  Modern foods at that time tended to include sugar (often as molasses) and flour (often as biscuits and bread).  Cultures who abandoned their traditional foods had narrow pallets, crooked teeth, narrow noses and nostrils, poor sinus development, underdeveloped faces, weak chins, and overall degenerated health.  Their appearance was generally poor.  It didn’t take long for these issues to develop; often only one generation. It was interesting that these cultures so happily gave up their traditional foods in favor of sugar and flour.  Possibly a testimony to the addictiveness of these foods.  

One of the most critical things this book pointed out was the importance of nutrition for pregnant women.  Our world of low fat, high carb, sugar soaked, and chemical ridden foods is so bad for moms and their developing babies.  Dr. Price determined that moms need the nutrition of fat, meat, eggs, and organ meats.  This is nothing like what doctors are advising most moms today.  I wonder if this has anything to do with so many new diseases, allergies, behavior problems and the wild success of orthodontists!

My best application of this book to our culture is that we should not be afraid of meat and fats.  We should be much more wary of processed foods, sugar (even cane, raw, molasses, palm, coconut and other “health” foods), and processed carbs.  We also should consider adding fermented foods into our diet, such as pickles, sauerkraut, kimchee, and cultured milk products like yogurt, kefir, and cheeses.  

My one criticism of this book of research is that Dr. Price did not focus very much on fresh fruits and vegetables, but we know these are an important part of healthy eating.  I think the reason fresh foods were not focused on is because he was looking for nutritional trends that predicted health across many cultures.  Some of the cultures he studied ate no fresh fruits and vegetables at all, and were still healthy (Ex: Inuit and Maasai).  Yet, I noticed that many MORE cultures who experienced vibrant health did include fresh foods as part of their traditional diet.  

All in all, I liked this book.  It clearly demonstrates the dangers of sugar, flour, and processed foods, not only on our current health, but also on the health of the next generation. It is something we all should be taking very seriously.  

Eat your veggies, and organ meats,

Robin

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Grain Free Bacon and Onion Quiche

Spinach and onions (or leeks) are common in winter CSA bags.  I always include eggs and greens in my breakfast, and this quiche hits the spot, with no sugar, no grains, yummy greens, and beautiful farm eggs.  Here is another grain free breakfast quiche.  

onions small

Ingredients

  • ¼ pound of chemical free bacon, from grass fed hogs
  • 1 bunch of spinach, chard, or young tender kale (not chopped)
  • Butter
  • One big sweet onion or a couple of leeks
  • 4 eggs from pasture raised hens, whisked
  • ½ cup of milk or cream
  • 1 tsp of Dijon mustard
  • 2 ounces of goat cheese, feta or farm cheese
  • 1/3 cup parmesan cheese

Directions

  • Preheat oven to 375
  • Fry the bacon and crumble it.  Reserve the fat
  • Butter a pie pan and press the spinach leaves into the bottom of the pan, like a crust
  • Sauté the onions or leeks in the bacon fat until clear and fragrant
  • Mix together the eggs, cream, Dijon mustard, goat cheese, and crumbled bacon  
  • Pour into the pie pan over the spinach leaves (do not stir)
  • Top with grated parmesan
  • Dot with butter
  • Bake for 30-40 minutes, or until set

Of course, I would serve this with roasted kale that is just getting crispy.  Make a bed of the kale on plates and place slices of this beautiful quiche on top.  

Eat your veggies,

Robin

Grain Free Bacon and Onion Quiche
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Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
40 min
Total Time
50 min
Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
40 min
Total Time
50 min
Ingredients
  1. ¼ pound of chemical free bacon, from grass fed hogs
  2. 1 bunch of spinach, chard, or young tender kale (not chopped)
  3. Butter
  4. One big sweet onion or a couple of leeks
  5. 4 eggs from pasture raised hens, whisked
  6. ½ cup of milk or cream
  7. 1 tsp of Dijon mustard
  8. 2 ounces of goat cheese, feta or farm cheese
  9. 1/3 cup parmesan cheese
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 375
  2. Fry the bacon and crumble it. Reserve the fat
  3. Butter a pie pan and press the spinach leaves into the bottom of the pan, like a crust
  4. Sauté the onions or leeks in the bacon fat until clear and fragrant
  5. Mix together the eggs, cream, Dijon mustard, goat cheese, and crumbled bacon
  6. Pour into the pie pan over the spinach leaves (do not stir)
  7. Top with grated parmesan
  8. Dot with butter
  9. Bake for 30-40 minutes, or until set
Notes
  1. Of course, I would serve this with roasted kale that is just getting crispy. Make a bed of the kale on plates and place slices of this beautiful quiche on top.
Bell's Best Berries http://bellsbestberries.com/
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Own the Farm

 Wisdom Leading to Freedom for Farmers

Proverbs is a great book of wisdom.  Here is one of my favorite, but difficult nuggets: “The wealthy rule over the poor; a borrower is a slave to a lender” Proverbs 22:7. In our modern world, this piece of great wisdom seems awfully hard to live by.  Didn’t Solomon know that cars, travel, land, equipment, education and houses all cost lots of money, and that there is no way to have that much cash?  It seems like we have to have debt, at least for the big ticket items, but is that really true?

Rabbit Eye 5 blueberry

If you want to farm, consider the wisdom of Solomon.  Debt seems very easy to come by for farmers.  Even the government is involved in helping farmers get loans, so they can buy land or equipment.  The problem is that farming doesn’t make very much profit, so paying off the loans can be next to impossible.  Stressing about how to pay for things takes the joy out of life, and ironically, most people start farming because it makes them happy!  If this is true, then what should a new young farmer do? 

It won’t be easy.  Start with what you can afford, without going in debt.  Till up the back yard!  Till up your grandpa’s or your aunt’s back yard.  Plow up an empty lot!  Borrow some space from anyone you can.  You may even find someone willing to lease you land at a reasonable price.  We started with not much more than our back yard, a troy-bilt hand tiller, and a hoe.  Then, find creative ways to sell your produce, to get some money coming in.  Some people like to sell produce at farmers markets, others a CSA, some to restaurants, and some even make prepared products like jellies or soaps.  Find your passion.  The key will be that you need to do this while still keeping your day job.  It takes hard work.  Save every dime you can, to reinvest in your dream.  This is how Jay and I did it.  We BOTH worked full time and farmed less than 2 acres.  Then, we lived well below our means in a tiny house, drove old cars, and never went shopping just for the fun of spending.  We tried hard to live on the farm income, and socked away our employment income, so we could eventually buy the land and equipment we wanted.  It took years, but we did it!  We bought a small farm, not a huge million dollar farm.  We probably could have qualified for some of the government subsidized or guaranteed loans to help, but in the end, I’m happy we didn’t.  

I know everyone has different attitudes and tolerances for debt.  If gutting it out, scrimping and saving until you have the cash sounds too hard, at least do your best to borrow as little as possible, and pay it off as quickly as possible.  Take my advice: Learn to find joy in the people you love and the beautiful world God made.   A small farm won’t support debt or extravagant spending.  You will need to have the fortitude to stick it out, working and saving until you can, little by little, build your dream.  Even once you buy the farm, you STILL might need to figure out another income.  Sometimes the spouse works, others work part time and farm, and some do at home jobs.  It isn’t easy, but most worthwhile things aren’t easy.  Freedom!  That is the goal.

Eat your veggies,

Robin

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Greens with Ginger

Greens with Ginger

This is a fresh and bright take on winter greens.  I find myself in a rut when it comes to using all the fresh greens we have all winter.  All too often, I either sauté them in butter with a little garlic and lemon or else cut them into1 thin slivers and serve them as a raw salad with olive oil and balsamic.  Although these are delicious, I needed something fresh and different.  I found the basics of this recipe in a cookbook at a house we were staying at on the beach for a short vacation this winter.  I’m not sure who to credit it to, but it was yummy and versatile.  CSA members will see spinach and spring greens in their bags for the next few months so it is great to have several good ways to cook greens.

Ingredients
1 ½ cups of fresh orange juice
One big chunk of peeled fresh ginger, grated
Juice from one lemon
One big bunch of spinach, chard, or tender young kale, chopped
Chunk of real butter
Toasted chopped pecans
Salt to taste

Directions
Pour the orange juice into a pot and bring to a boil. Boil until the liquid is reduced to about ½ cup
Add the lemon juice and set aside
Sauté the chopped greens in the butter until tender
Add the orange sauce and sauté for another minute or two
Add the pecans
Adjust the seasonings with some salt and pepper and serve

Eat your veggies,
Robin

Spinach with Ginger
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Ingredients
  1. 1 ½ cups of fresh orange juice
  2. One big chunk of peeled fresh ginger, grated
  3. Juice from one lemon
  4. One big bunch of spinach, chard, or tender young kale, chopped
  5. Chunk of real butter
  6. Toasted chopped pecans
  7. Salt to taste
Instructions
  1. Pour the orange juice into a pot and bring to a boil. Boil until the liquid is reduced to about ½ cup
  2. Add the lemon juice and set aside
  3. Sauté the chopped greens in the butter until tender
  4. Add the orange sauce and sauté for another minute or two
  5. Add the pecans
  6. Adjust the seasonings with some salt and pepper and serve
Notes
  1. http://bellsbestberries.com/product/davids-kosher-salt-40oz/
Bell's Best Berries http://bellsbestberries.com/
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Let’s Get Mechanized

Managing Farm Equipment For a Small Farm 

Up until now, we have been farming only our six acre homestead, and have been doing everything by hand.  This includes shoveling compost from the back of the truck, tilling it in with our Troy-bilt, hand weeding between the plants, and using straw between the rows to suppress weeds.  We even use a simple backpack sprayer to apply seaweed extract to the crops.  With the recent purchase of a new 11 acre farm and Jay’s 56th birthday, we have come to realize this can’t go on.  There are also some economics involved.  Our small farm provides just enough income to pay the bills.  No more.  Heaven help us when the truck blows up, the plumbing springs a leak or one of us has a major medical expense.  A little more income from a few more acres might just put us where we want to be.  With these few more acres, we’ll need a little more mechanization.  It might just make this job a little more fun anyway!  Here is the equipment purchase plan.

tractor

To break the land, we have an old disc we bought from a farmer down the road, that simply needs a new bearing.  It can be easily ordered online, and Jay can get this into action.  Total cost is only a few hundred bucks.  We will use this disc for our initial pass at the new land, to break new soil.  Once we get the soil into farmable condition, we rarely will need it.

I priced some manure spreaders, that go behind the tractor and spread compost in a line, however, the price was over $6000.  That’s not going to happen.  I have a vision of high school kids shoveling compost in the rows and under the new blueberry bushes.  That is going to be a pain, but I don’t have another answer.  This one is going to have to wait.

Then, we will till the land into soft friable ground with a rear tined tractor mounted PTO driven tiller.  They are hard to find used, because people love these for their home gardens.  We saw one at a used equipment yard in Monroe for about $900.  That sounds pretty expensive to me, considering you can get a new one for $1400.  My guess is that we will go with the new one.  This seems like a piece of equipment that will get used a lot, so maybe we need to put a little more money here.

Next, we will throw up some 3-ft beds with a used bedmaker we just purchased from Morning-glory Farm.  This cool piece of equipment will make a nice and tidy raised bed we can plant on.  Raised beds improve crop drainage, as well as allow the soil to warm up quicker in the spring.  Up until now, we haven’t had this luxury, so I am very excited about this new equipment.  I think it will improve our farming hugely.

After we make the beds, we will still have to plant by hand with an Earthway seeder.  I looked at different rigs that connected seeders together and mounted them behind the tractor, but they were really expensive and I did not feel confident they would actually work.  We will plant by hand.  This is probably going to work better anyway because we plant very intensely, as well as in a patchwork of different crops, to prevent a monocrop situation.  I did ask Jay to attach some type of marking device to the bed maker, to be sure my seed lines are straight and spaced correctly.  Spacing correctly is very important to the next step of cultivation.  Most of our crops will be spaced with three rows of plants on top of the three foot bed.  

We are going to buy a small cultivator.  This looks like a simple bar, with hooks attached to it, spaced so they go between the rows of plants on the bed.  I also want it to have a bigger foot attached to each end, to get the weeds out from between each bed.  With our very intensive planting methods, we normally don’t have to worry about weeds, once the crop grows big enough to close the space between the rows, because it shades out all the weeds.  This cultivator will be used in the few weeks after planting, before the crop is big enough to knock down the weeds between the plants.

Lastly, we plan on looking for a tractor mounted sprayer we can use to make our weekly seaweed extract applications.  These treatments are a key part of our farming, because seaweed makes the crop more resistant to diseases and insects, as well as more tolerant to environmental stresses, such as heat and drought.  No more lugging around a 50 pound backpack sprayer.  We are going uptown, baby!

So that is the plan.  This will be our first foray into mechanization.  I hope we can find the right balance between having the right equipment to make the job doable, but not get close to the idea of “bigger is better”.  Earl Butz, Secretary of Agriculture in the 70s, told farmers to “get big or get out”.  I don’t want to do that.  We just don’t want to die trying here on the farm.  Hope we can make the balance.

Eat your veggies,

Robin

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Good Bye Bad Friend

IMG_1263

I am going to seriously minimize my contact with a bad friend this year.  His name is “Alcohol”, but he also goes by Cabernet, Zinfandel, or Syrah.  When I first met this friend, I thought it was a good match.  He always made me feel happy, and magically helped me get through stressful social situations.  He even made my long hard day feel better when we sat down on the couch together in the evening.  Then, I started to realize, although this friend seems like a good one, he really isn’t.  He brings along way too much baggage.

The first thing I noticed was that this friend is too demanding.  He wanted to hang out every single night.  It used to seem nice spending relaxing time together, but now I am starting to notice him worming his way into way too many parts of my life.  I don’t like friends who try to own me, and that’s what it feels like.  Every night he calls.  Every social situation he wants to show up.  Every dinner he expects to be invited.  He even tried to convince me I wouldn’t be able to have a pleasant relaxing evening without him!  Then he told me I wouldn’t be able to have a fun evening without him!  This is too high maintenance! 

Then I noticed him waking me up at night!  What kind of a friend does that?  First, we sit on the couch in the evening and relax, then bam! He wakes me up at 2 am, and wants me to stay awake every night.  I don’t have time for this.  I have a job to do, a farm to run, and people in my life who I love.  I can’t be walking around like a sleep-deprived grump.  It gets in the way of my life.  Not only that, I just don’t feel good if I’m not sleeping well, and I think lack of sleep is unhealthy.

I have a huge commitment to my health. I write notes to you about your health, and provide fresh veggies to keep my community healthy!   I eat healthy foods (even if it cost more).  I work out every day.  I am very careful about the personal care products I put on my body.  I am very careful about the cleaning products we use in our home.  It is because I want to be healthy.  With this much of a commitment to good health, why would I compromise it with this bad friend, who is high maintenance and keeps me awake at night?  Oh, and he also screws up my workouts!

So, I took the bull by the horns and kicked him out of my life.  It took about a week to get used to not having him around, but once I got used to it, I noticed how much better I felt.  I was sleeping through the night.  I was up and at the gym early in the morning and feeling strong.  Even my achy knees felt better.  The strangest thing was that my brain felt clearer, and I didn’t even know it was foggy! 

Some of what prompted me to kick out this friend was a 30 day no alcohol challenge that Ben Greenfield did with his friend Jason Sissel.  Jason had blood work done and then embarked on a 30 day alcohol fast.  He didn’t change his diet or anything else in his life during the 30 days.  Then he redid his blood work.  The results were sobering. 

AST liver enzymes dropped from 24 to 18. 

71% drop in triglycerides. (386 down to 113)

50% increase in TSH (thyroid) hormone

80% increase in vitamin D

Significant improvement in most lipid biomarkers

Hemoglobin A1C dropped from 5.7 to 5.4

Lost 8.8 pounds

Alcohol really isn’t a very good friend.  It comes on sweetly, then insidiously worms its way into too many parts of your life, including your health.

Good bye, bad friend!  I have no room in my healthy life for you. 

Robin

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Easy Homemade Sauerkraut

I remember my ex-grandparents, Claude and Bertha Kimsey.  Maybe this needs a little explaining in our complicated world.  Claude and Bertha were the grandparents of my ex-husband, and very interesting people.  They lived in Skeenah Valley near Franklin, NC in a small cabin.  I remember Claude telling me how they made sauerkraut every fall.  Here are the basics.

image

Ingredients:
A whole bunch of shredded raw cabbage (1 cabbage makes about 1 quart)
Salt
Clean Mason jars and lids
Very hot water

Directions:
Tightly pack the shredded cabbage into the Mason jars (a wooden spoon works well, to mash it in there)
Sprinkle about 1 tsp of salt in each jar
Pour in hot water until the jar is filled to the neck (water line should be higher than cabbage, throughout entire fermentation process)
Wipe off the rims of the jars and put the lids on loosely (or use cloth and rubber bands for air flow)
Let these sit and ferment at room temperature as long as you like, out of direct sunlight.

As they ferment, liquid may ooze out the top of the jar (that’s why you want the lids loose).  This is normal and not a problem.  If they are on your counter, you might want to put the jars in a pan to catch those liquids.  Claude used to just take these jars out back and put them in his shed.  It had an earth floor, so he didn’t care if they oozed.  They stayed there all winter and he went out and got a new jar whenever he wanted kraut for dinner.  The kraut flavor will intensify the longer it ferments.  Fermenting will stop if you put the jars in the fridge or out in the shed during the Franklin winter. Tightening the lid when you put it in the fridge is fine, since most of the fermenting stops when it gets cold.  Oh, key info, if you see a little white mold on the top, no worries!  This is normal.  Just skim it off before you put your kraut in the fridge. For better pictures than mine, and slightly different methods on the same basic recipe, check out this website (the kitchen).

There are plenty of good reasons to include fermented food in your diet, besides the fact that they taste good.  Probably the most important is that they are a source of beneficial probiotics that your gut needs to stay healthy.  Claude and Bertha may not have known much about gut bacteria, but our ancestors, for thousands of years, have used fermentation to preserve their foods with good reason.  It not only preserved the food, but it kept them healthy, strong, and nourished.  Thanks grandma

Eat your fermented veggies,

Robin

Easy Homemade Sauerkraut
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Prep Time
30 min
Total Time
30 min
Prep Time
30 min
Total Time
30 min
Ingredients
  1. A whole bunch of shredded raw cabbage (1 cabbage makes about 1 quart)
  2. Salt
  3. Clean Mason jars and lids
  4. Very hot water
Instructions
  1. Tightly pack the shredded cabbage into the Mason jars (a wooden spoon works well, to mash it in there)
  2. Sprinkle about 1 tsp of salt in each jar
  3. Pour in hot water until the jar is filled to the neck (water line should be higher than cabbage, throughout entire fermentation process)
  4. Wipe off the rims of the jars and put the lids on loosely (or use cloth and rubber bands for air flow)
  5. Let these sit and ferment at room temperature as long as you like, out of direct sunlight.
Notes
  1. As they ferment, liquid may ooze out the top of the jar (that’s why you want the lids loose). This is normal and not a problem. If they are on your counter, you might want to put the jars in a pan to catch those liquids. Claude used to just take these jars out back and put them in his shed. It had an earth floor, so he didn’t care if they oozed. They stayed there all winter and he went out and got a new jar whenever he wanted kraut for dinner. The kraut flavor will intensify the longer it ferments. Fermenting will stop if you put the jars in the fridge or out in the shed during the Franklin winter. Tightening the lid when you put it in the fridge is fine, since most of the fermenting stops when it gets cold. Oh, key info, if you see a little white mold on the top, no worries! This is normal. Just skim it off before you put your kraut in the fridge. For better pictures than mine, and slightly different methods on the same basic recipe, check out this website (the kitchen).
Adapted from Papa Claud
Adapted from Papa Claud
Bell's Best Berries http://bellsbestberries.com/

  Thanks grandma

Eat your fermented veggies,

Robin

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Greek Sweet Potato Oven Fries

Sweet potato fries are suddenly very popular.  Even our non-veggie eating daughter is suddenly into sweet potatoes and sweet potato fries, now that she is a “crossfitter”.  Sadly, too many people end up buying a bag of frozen fries or tots.  These are so easy, taste super yummy, are cheap to make, and if you cook them yourself, you know exactly what is in them!  These are well worth the extra few minutes.

photo credit @organiceater

photo credit @organiceater

Everyone will love this one.  You can make it fancy by making a curry dip for these.  Just mix about a cup and a half of plain Greek yogurt with a tablespoon of curry powder, a squeeze of lime or lemon juice and salt and pepper.  My friend the Organic Eater @organiceater tells me that honeymustard is great with these.  She says that the secret to great honey mustard dressing is that it’s not just honey and mustard! Add mayo!  These oven fries are so yummy though, I bet you don’t even think about the dip. 

Greek Sweet Potato Oven Fries
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Prep Time
15 min
Cook Time
30 min
Prep Time
15 min
Cook Time
30 min
Ingredients
  1. Four medium sweet potatoes, scrubbed but not peeled
  2. 2-3 tablespoons of your favorite oil
  3. Juice of 1 lemon (couple of tablespoons)
  4. Chopped fresh oregano (tablespoon or so)
  5. Chopped fresh garlic (couple of cloves)
  6. Chopped parsley (as garnish, after cooking)
  7. Salt and pepper
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 425 degrees
  2. Cut the sweet potatoes into wedges or sticks
  3. Toss them in a bowl with the lemon, oil and spices (except parsley)
  4. Spread them in a single layer on a baking dish
  5. Bake until golden brown and tender (about 30 minutes)
  6. You might want to flip them about half way through if your oven cooks hotter on the bottom than the top.
  7. When they come out of the oven, garnish them with the chopped parsley and salt and pepper to taste.
Adapted from @organiceater
Adapted from @organiceater
Bell's Best Berries http://bellsbestberries.com/
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Kale with Caramelized Onions

Saturday at the Farmers’ Market, I met a new young chef doing a demonstration, Chef John with Food For Life.  What he was cooking smelled pretty darn good, so I strolled over to see what he was working on. I was impressed that he had the book, Nourishing Traditions, on the table.  He was working on a simple way to use fresh kale. Everyone who stopped by really loved it, even the kale haters!  With his permission, here are the basics of this simple but tasty recipe.

OE kale with caramalized onions

Serve to even your kale hating friends. They will love it! The sweetness of the caramelized onions and apples beautifully balance the earthy taste of the kale, and the balsamic makes it perfect. The chef at the market blanched the kale, but I didn’t go to the trouble, and it was just fine.

Kale with Caramelized onions
Serve to even your kale hating friends. They will love it! The sweetness of the caramelized onions and apples beautifully balance the earthy taste of the kale, and the balsamic makes it perfect.
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Ingredients
  1. One large onion, roughly chopped
  2. Butter from grass-fed cows
  3. One apple, diced into tiny bits
  4. One large bunch of curly kale, washed and chopped
  5. Balsamic vinegar
  6. Salt
Instructions
  1. Add a large chunk of butter to melt in a big skillet
  2. Toss in the chopped onions and a touch of salt, and sauté at medium heat, stirring almost constantly, until the onions are a beautiful golden brown.
  3. Add the apples and continue cooking until they are soft.
  4. Add the chopped kale and cook until soft.
  5. Finish with salt to taste and a splash of balsamic vinegar
Adapted from Chef John
Adapted from Chef John
Bell's Best Berries http://bellsbestberries.com/
Eat your veggies!

Robin

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