This is How it Should Work

We had a disaster happen on Saturday.  Our cold room went out.  No cooling at all.  For people who deal in produce, this is one of the worst things that could happen.  We quickly realized we needed two essential parts to fix the cold room, but they couldn’t be put in place until Tuesday.  This was a huge problem, because we would need the cold room on Monday, to hold the produce we put together for a big CSA delivery, as well as deliveries to lots of restaurants on Tuesday.  For a moment, we considered simply canceling everything.  With no cooling, there can be no fresh produce.

Then Jay had an idea!  One of the local growers we get produce from, Norman Baucom, has a state of the art cold room.  He grows blackberries, and they are not in season right now.  Jay texted him and asked if he could please do a neighbor a favor, and within an hour the problem was solved.  Norman quickly offered to fire up his cold room and let us use it as long as we needed.  This is how the world should work.

Although we only have a business relationship with Norman, we get blackberries from him for our CSA members and restaurants, he graciously offered whatever we needed to solve this big problem.  This reminds me of how things worked in days gone by.  He didn’t ask for money.  He didn’t even hesitate.  He didn’t ask for anything.  He simply said “Sure. You can use it for as long as you need”.  Wow.

Farmhouse

We live in the town of Unionville.  We still have some vestiges of this type of neighborly kindness.  There is another grower in the community who raises chickens, who needed our tractor because his wouldn’t do the job.  We didn’t hesitate to give it to him.  Soon, a load of manure (compost gold) showed up at our house.  I just love how this type of community caring happens.  

I love this place.  Praise God for North Carolina!

Eat your fresh and refrigerated veggies!
Robin

Share this with a friend!Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someoneShare on Google+
Posted in csa, on the farm | Tagged | 2 Comments

The Changing Face of Food in Charlotte

Last week, Chef Matthew Krenz (The Asbury) stopped by our booth at Atherton Market.  He said something that has stuck with me.  He mentioned that over the past year he really has seen a positive change in the food scene at the market and all over Charlotte.  He went on to say that a couple of years ago, the farmers markets had the basic types of produce and not much variety.  Now, the market is full of so many different choices, it is a serious “produce education” to stop by all the booths!  What causes this type of change?  

To begin with, food trends start in fine restaurants and are dictated by excellent chefs.  There are so many great chefs in Charlotte, and they all seem to have no fear of unusual ingredients.  You can bet that if they find something cool and interesting on a market table, it is going to show up in something delicious that night at some great restaurant.  This type of inventive work drives growers to meet that need and constantly strive to grow and bring the coolest stuff!  It has changed the face of the market.  If fine restaurants begin serving unusual foods like wild foraged nettles and ramps, and make them delicious, it won’t be long before consumers want to explore these ingredients themselves.  Most consumers are first introduced to new foods at a nice restaurant.  

IMG_6087

The paleo movement also seems to have shifted food trends.  The paleo eaters who stop by the market are not only looking for healthy vegetables, but are thrilled if they can find edible flowers, wild foraged greens, all types of herbs and more unusual items. I think this is a great idea!  The more varied the diet, with every type of healthy and colorful thing, the better.  I remember a few years ago there was no way I would be able to sell garnet stemmed dandelions.  Yesterday the paleo eaters snatched those up like there was no tomorrow!

IMG_6102

Additionally, “local food” is red hot!  Large commercial growers might feed the world, but small local growers romance the world.  I love the way so many people in the Charlotte area are committed to buying local! The commitment is so deep, that they plan their meals around what is available seasonally from their local growers.  We have regular market customers who don’t buy produce at the grocery store.  They get it at the market and choose from what is available.  Our CSA customers are the same. Their meals come from what is in their CSA bag, which is local and seasonal.  This type of commitment to local produce gives growers huge freedom to try new things, because they know their customer base is committed to seasonal local produce, to the point they are willing to go outside their comfort zone and try new things.  

We live in a wonderful city.  My bet is that one day Charlotte will be known as a food destination.  The food is here. The chefs are here. The customers are here. It won’t be long.

Eat your veggies,
Robin

Share this with a friend!Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someoneShare on Google+
Posted in csa | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Asparagus is Best Served Simply

One of the first veggies of spring is asparagus.  When you get it fresh cut, it is absolutely nothing like the dry stringy stuff you get in the grocery store.  It is fresh, tender, and absolutely delicious!  It is so tasty, it really is best prepared very simply.  Here are my two go to methods:

SFC_asparagus_labeled

Simple steamed asparagus.

Ingredients:

  1. One bunch of fresh asparagus
  2. Dish towel
  3. Sea salt
  4. Butter 

Directions:

Wash the asparagus and wrap the wet asparagus in a clean damp dish towel.  Stick it in the microwave for two minutes. (If you have concerns with using the microwave, read this) Remove from microwave and serve on plates.  Add fresh butter and course sea salt.  Serve it up!

Simple Grilled asparagus

Ingredients:

  1. One bunch of fresh asparagus
  2. Olive oil
  3. Sea salt
  4. Cracked pepper
  5. Parmesan cheese

Directions:

Wash and dry the asparagus and spread it out on a plate.  Toss it with your favorite olive oil.  Put it on a hot grill until it has a few sear mark and is bright green.  It shouldn’t take long.  Remove to a serving platter and sprinkle with sea salt, cracked pepper and a sprinkle of parmesan cheese.  Serve it up! (roasting on a pan in a 400 degree oven until done, can work in place of the grill, if necessary)

Eat your veggies,
Robin

Share this with a friend!Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someoneShare on Google+
Posted in cooking tips, vegetable tips | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

The Perfect Spring Menu

The Perfect Spring Menu

This Easter we had a family reunion in my father’s home town, Salisbury, NC.  My older brother, Scott, had the great idea of asking one of the excellent chefs in our area to  “personal chef” one of the evening meals for the family.  Amazingly, we were able to get Chef David Arey to travel up there to do this for us, and he prepared the perfect spring meal.  All the veggies needed to make this yummy meal have been in your Spring CSA bags!  Here is the menu:

  • Short ribs
  • Sweet potatoes
  • Roasted asparagus with garlic
  • Kale salad with local soft cheese
  • Fried apple rings with ice cream

Asparagus dinner2

 

 

 

The sweet potatoes were sliced thinly and layered with cream, butter and maybe cinnamon and baked in the oven.  They cooled and were sliced into squares.  The squares were then seared in a cast iron skillet.  They were so so so good!  Even my picky eating nephew loved them.  The asparagus was prepared simply, which really highlighted the fresh local flavor of this vegetable.  It was the perfect accompaniment to the heavier beef and sweet potatoes.  Everything was absolutely perfect.

So, guess what I’m about to make for dinner.  The same menu, only without the ice cream!  I’m pretty sure it won’t come close to Chef David’s creation, but honestly, this meal is something that I can prepare a “Robin version” and it will be great!  I love spring.  I love great local produce.  I love our local chefs!

If you want Chef David to do a great party for you, head on over to DFC Farms Trading Company and Cafe , and talk to him about it.  This local food restaurant is right on the square in Monroe.  They feature grass fed beef, local produce, local milk and cheeses, and a darn good breakfast and lunch!  Don’t miss it. 

Eat your veggies,
Robin 

Share this with a friend!Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someoneShare on Google+
Posted in recipes | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Farm To Table Dinner: Reserve Your Seat

Don’t miss our Farm to Table dinner!

Every spring we host a farm to table dinner at the farm.  It is carefully prepared by Chef Craig Barbour with Roots Good Local Food and never ceases to beautifully, creatively and deliciously highlight the wonderful spring produce from the farm.  It is held in May so the weather is great and the farm is at its fresh best.  Don’t miss it.  This year it is planned for Saturday May 16th.  

Check out the menu we have planned.  

  • Chilled Herb Soup
  • Fresh Mint, Dill, Basil, Chervil and Kefir a touch of Limoncello, Fresh Lemon Zest, and Extra Virgin Carrot Oil
  • Tamed Wild Greens
  • A mixture of wild and cultivated greens fresh out of the soil, with charred peach, shaved radish, spring onion, and wildflower vinaigrette
  • Roasted Baby Roots
  • A beautiful montage of Bell’s Baby Roots Veggies, Roasted and tossed with our house made fresh herb pesto with fresh arugula and garlic chive
  • Young Spring Chicken
  • Marinated and grilled on the California coal fired grill, settled on a bed of lightly wilted Swiss Chard, Kale and Caramelized leeks, garnished with marinated Chard Stems
  • Fresh Bread with Melted Garlic 
  • Dessert
  • Strawberry Tort with Lemon Basil Creme Fresh

 

IMG_0402.JPG

photo credit @organiceater

 

Farm to Table dinners are one of the best ways to get in touch with where your veggies are coming from, get some great new ideas about how to prepare them, enjoy the beautiful outdoors, meet some new people and have a great time!  Lots of farms have them.  If you can’t make it to ours, be sure to find one this season.  Know your farmer!

Eat your veggies,
Robin

Share this with a friend!Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someoneShare on Google+
Posted in csa, events | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

Spring Is Here

April On The Farm

I just love April!  Spring is announced by the flowers blooming, the breeze warming, and the bees bumbling! The farm is in full production!  We have every inch of our Unionville farm planted with cool season crops such as broccoli, lettuce, beets, turnips, lettuce, radishes, and a host of beautiful specialty crops that will mostly go to Charlotte area restaurants. 

lilac and bee2

We have one field that we call the “Triangle” that has most of our herbs.  Several years ago, it started with just a couple of lines.  Now almost the entire field is entirely herbs!  I bet by next year it will indeed be all herbs.  When I first started putting herbs in CSA bags and bringing them to the market, it didn’t seem like anyone liked them.  The CSA members often asked what to do with them or even told me that they didn’t use them.  We stopped including them for a while. We often would bring home bags and bags of unsold herbs from the market.  The only people who really wanted herbs were chefs.  Now it seems things are changing.  We put some type of herb in all our standard sized CSA bags, and most people like getting them.  We have an entire table of fresh herbs at the market and sell out almost every week!  We have lots of herbs on our Chef Produce List and get lots of orders for them every week.  Herbs just seemed a little slow to catch on, but now that people know we have them, and lots of them, they depend on us for them.  We have a huge variety of herbs such as parsley, cilantro, chervil, dill, fennel, thyme, oregano, different mints, sorrel, red vein sorrel, lavender, savory, marjoram, many types of basil, tarragon, and even odd things like lovage and sweet woodruff.  The chefs in Charlotte are great, no herb intimidates them!

We have a field up by the road called the “Cashew”.  This field used to be a pasture for my horse named Cashew.  It is our roughest ground, and we put the toughest crops down there.  It also might just flood if the weather is really wet.  That field has our Asian vegetables, beets, turnips, kale, broccoli and onions.  It is our biggest field and most intimidating because this is only the second year it has been in production, so it also has the worst soil and the most weeds.  I am so thrilled this year to have some better trained crew to help keep up with this field.  Tomorrow we will have a crew of five down there keeping it in great shape.  They will have fun too, because this field runs along Unionville Indian Trail Road, so all these high school guys can wave at their buddies going by in their big trucks.  If you ever drive by this field, check out how we do our planting.  Everything is spaced really close together.  This is intentional.  We put the crops so close together that they quickly grow together and shade out any weeds that want to grow between the rows.  I hope that once we go through the field tomorrow, we will not need to do much else down there, except a little touch-up now and then.   

Weeds are probably the biggest challenge to pesticide free growing.  Without using herbicides, there are not a lot of easy solutions.  Our strategy is to plant the crop very dense, in an attempt to quickly shade out any competing weeds.  We also want the crop to be growing fast and strong, and we quickly hoe the weeds when they are very small.  This gives the crop the best chance to outcompete the weeds, and hopefully get big enough to have the upper hand.  It is never perfect.  If you ever go visit a pesticide free farmer, you will see there are weeds in the fields.  It is not cost effective to pay labor to keep everything perfectly clean.  You just can’t sell the produce for enough money to warrant that type of labor investment.  So, we try to keep things clean enough, and make the balance between managing labor costs and growing a good crop.  That normally means there are a few weeds!  I try to look on the bright side and consider that weeds also are habitat for beneficial insects to reproduce and live.  We need the weeds!

One of our goals last year was to get better at how we use our farm help, and give all of them more responsibility.  We must do this, or we are going to work ourselves to death.  I’m really happy to let you know that it is 3:45 in the afternoon and I am able to sit here at my computer while an amazing amount of work is going on right outside my window!  I’m not worried at all.  These guys rock!  We are getting better at this.

Enjoy the spring and eat your veggies!!

Robin

Share this with a friend!Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someoneShare on Google+
Posted in csa, on the farm | Tagged , | 1 Comment

Pac Choy with Mushrooms

Pac Choy with Mushrooms

If you head to the farmers market after a warmer than normal winter rain, you are likely to find someone selling shitake mushrooms.  Grab them!  They go perfectly with the pac choy from your CSA bag.  

Colorful Pac Choy

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons of peanut or coconut oil
  • 2 cloves of garlic
  • 3 medium size heads of pac choy, chopped in big chunks
  • ½ pound of chopped mushrooms.  Shitakes are great, but you can use anything you find in the grocery store.
  • 1 tsp honey
  • 1 tsp of sesame oil
  • 1 tablespoon of soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon of rice wine or sherry

Directions

  • Sauté the pac choy and garlic in oil for a minute or two, until just wilted
  • Add the chopped mushrooms and sauté another minute or two, until the mushrooms are barely cooked.
  • Mix together the honey, sesame oil, soy sauce, and rice wine, and pour over the pac choy and mushrooms
  • Stir until everything is glazed in the sauce and well heated.
  • Serve immediately.

I always love nuts on pac choy, so I would be very likely to add some toasted cashews or slivered almonds to this.  If you like heat, you also might want to add a little cayenne or sriracha.  This would also be totally yummy with some rough chopped sweet onions.  You could also make this same dish with almost any greens in your CSA bag.  Make it your own!

Enjoy!

Pac Choy with Mushrooms
Write a review
Print
Prep Time
15 min
Cook Time
15 min
Prep Time
15 min
Cook Time
15 min
Ingredients
  1. 2 tablespoons of peanut or coconut oil
  2. 2 cloves of garlic
  3. 3 medium size heads of pac choy, chopped in big chunks
  4. ½ pound of chopped mushrooms. Shitakes are great, but you can use anything you find in the grocery store.
  5. 1 tsp honey
  6. 1 tsp of sesame oil
  7. 1 tablespoon of soy sauce
  8. 1 tablespoon of rice wine or sherry
Instructions
  1. Sauté the pac choy and garlic in oil for a minute or two, until just wilted
  2. Add the chopped mushrooms and sauté another minute or two, until the mushrooms are barely cooked.
  3. Mix together the honey, sesame oil, soy sauce, and rice wine, and pour over the pac choy and mushrooms
  4. Stir until everything is glazed in the sauce and well heated.
  5. Serve immediately.
Notes
  1. I always love nuts on pac choy, so I would be very likely to add some toasted cashews or slivered almonds to this. If you like heat, you also might want to add a little cayenne or sriracha. This would also be totally yummy with some rough chopped sweet onions. You could also make this same dish with almost any greens in your CSA bag.
  2. Make it your own!
Bell's Best Berries http://bellsbestberries.com/
Share this with a friend!Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someoneShare on Google+
Posted in recipes | Leave a comment

Nutrition and Physical Degeneration Book Review

Nutrition and Physical Degeneration

Weston A. Price

So many of my foodie and health nut friends talk about this book, as well as the cookbook Nourishing Traditions by Sally Fallon, that I decided I had to read them, so I could intelligently participate in the conversations.  I honestly thought I already knew most of what would be in the book, and started to read it as an obligatory task.  I was wrong.  If everyone would take Dr. Price’s ideas to heart, our world would likely have far less degenerative disease.  

nutrition and physical degenerationDr. Price was a dentist in the early 1900’s, who traveled the world looking at people’s teeth, diet, and health.  He examined a wide range of primitive cultures to include the Inuit, American Indians, African, Latin Americans, Pacific Islanders, and Australians.  He correlated the diet of these cultures with their appearance, teeth, and general health.  He found that primitive cultures who ate their traditional diet, which most often included fatty meats, organs, fermented foods, and often raw foods, had great teeth.  This was true even though they didn’t have any of the modern dental hygiene products or modern dentistry we depend on.  They had straight teeth, high cheekbones, strong jaws, well developed noses and sinuses, and almost no cavities.  They also were quite attractive.  They almost never had problems like heart disease, diabetes, arthritis, and other degenerative problems.  The people grew into old age strong and healthy, with all their teeth.  The book is full of pictures of smiling people from all over the world, with beautiful faces and amazing teeth.  These pictures were compared to cultures who had given up their traditional foods, and the differences were sobering.

When these cultures were touched by “modern” (as modern as the early 1900’s) foods, their teeth and general health declined quickly.  Modern foods at that time tended to include sugar (often as molasses) and flour (often as biscuits and bread).  Cultures who abandoned their traditional foods had narrow pallets, crooked teeth, narrow noses and nostrils, poor sinus development, underdeveloped faces, weak chins, and overall degenerated health.  Their appearance was generally poor.  It didn’t take long for these issues to develop; often only one generation. It was interesting that these cultures so happily gave up their traditional foods in favor of sugar and flour.  Possibly a testimony to the addictiveness of these foods.  

One of the most critical things this book pointed out was the importance of nutrition for pregnant women.  Our world of low fat, high carb, sugar soaked, and chemical ridden foods is so bad for moms and their developing babies.  Dr. Price determined that moms need the nutrition of fat, meat, eggs, and organ meats.  This is nothing like what doctors are advising most moms today.  I wonder if this has anything to do with so many new diseases, allergies, behavior problems and the wild success of orthodontists!

My best application of this book to our culture is that we should not be afraid of meat and fats.  We should be much more wary of processed foods, sugar (even cane, raw, molasses, palm, coconut and other “health” foods), and processed carbs.  We also should consider adding fermented foods into our diet, such as pickles, sauerkraut, kimchee, and cultured milk products like yogurt, kefir, and cheeses.  

My one criticism of this book of research is that Dr. Price did not focus very much on fresh fruits and vegetables, but we know these are an important part of healthy eating.  I think the reason fresh foods were not focused on is because he was looking for nutritional trends that predicted health across many cultures.  Some of the cultures he studied ate no fresh fruits and vegetables at all, and were still healthy (Ex: Inuit and Maasai).  Yet, I noticed that many MORE cultures who experienced vibrant health did include fresh foods as part of their traditional diet.  

All in all, I liked this book.  It clearly demonstrates the dangers of sugar, flour, and processed foods, not only on our current health, but also on the health of the next generation. It is something we all should be taking very seriously.  

Eat your veggies, and organ meats,

Robin

Share this with a friend!Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someoneShare on Google+
Posted in nutrition and books | Leave a comment

Grain Free Bacon and Onion Quiche

Spinach and onions (or leeks) are common in winter CSA bags.  I always include eggs and greens in my breakfast, and this quiche hits the spot, with no sugar, no grains, yummy greens, and beautiful farm eggs.  Here is another grain free breakfast quiche.  

onions small

Ingredients

  • ¼ pound of chemical free bacon, from grass fed hogs
  • 1 bunch of spinach, chard, or young tender kale (not chopped)
  • Butter
  • One big sweet onion or a couple of leeks
  • 4 eggs from pasture raised hens, whisked
  • ½ cup of milk or cream
  • 1 tsp of Dijon mustard
  • 2 ounces of goat cheese, feta or farm cheese
  • 1/3 cup parmesan cheese

Directions

  • Preheat oven to 375
  • Fry the bacon and crumble it.  Reserve the fat
  • Butter a pie pan and press the spinach leaves into the bottom of the pan, like a crust
  • Sauté the onions or leeks in the bacon fat until clear and fragrant
  • Mix together the eggs, cream, Dijon mustard, goat cheese, and crumbled bacon  
  • Pour into the pie pan over the spinach leaves (do not stir)
  • Top with grated parmesan
  • Dot with butter
  • Bake for 30-40 minutes, or until set

Of course, I would serve this with roasted kale that is just getting crispy.  Make a bed of the kale on plates and place slices of this beautiful quiche on top.  

Eat your veggies,

Robin

Grain Free Bacon and Onion Quiche
Write a review
Print
Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
40 min
Total Time
50 min
Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
40 min
Total Time
50 min
Ingredients
  1. ¼ pound of chemical free bacon, from grass fed hogs
  2. 1 bunch of spinach, chard, or young tender kale (not chopped)
  3. Butter
  4. One big sweet onion or a couple of leeks
  5. 4 eggs from pasture raised hens, whisked
  6. ½ cup of milk or cream
  7. 1 tsp of Dijon mustard
  8. 2 ounces of goat cheese, feta or farm cheese
  9. 1/3 cup parmesan cheese
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 375
  2. Fry the bacon and crumble it. Reserve the fat
  3. Butter a pie pan and press the spinach leaves into the bottom of the pan, like a crust
  4. Sauté the onions or leeks in the bacon fat until clear and fragrant
  5. Mix together the eggs, cream, Dijon mustard, goat cheese, and crumbled bacon
  6. Pour into the pie pan over the spinach leaves (do not stir)
  7. Top with grated parmesan
  8. Dot with butter
  9. Bake for 30-40 minutes, or until set
Notes
  1. Of course, I would serve this with roasted kale that is just getting crispy. Make a bed of the kale on plates and place slices of this beautiful quiche on top.
Bell's Best Berries http://bellsbestberries.com/
Share this with a friend!Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someoneShare on Google+
Posted in csa, recipes | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Own the Farm

 Wisdom Leading to Freedom for Farmers

Proverbs is a great book of wisdom.  Here is one of my favorite, but difficult nuggets: “The wealthy rule over the poor; a borrower is a slave to a lender” Proverbs 22:7. In our modern world, this piece of great wisdom seems awfully hard to live by.  Didn’t Solomon know that cars, travel, land, equipment, education and houses all cost lots of money, and that there is no way to have that much cash?  It seems like we have to have debt, at least for the big ticket items, but is that really true?

Rabbit Eye 5 blueberry

If you want to farm, consider the wisdom of Solomon.  Debt seems very easy to come by for farmers.  Even the government is involved in helping farmers get loans, so they can buy land or equipment.  The problem is that farming doesn’t make very much profit, so paying off the loans can be next to impossible.  Stressing about how to pay for things takes the joy out of life, and ironically, most people start farming because it makes them happy!  If this is true, then what should a new young farmer do? 

It won’t be easy.  Start with what you can afford, without going in debt.  Till up the back yard!  Till up your grandpa’s or your aunt’s back yard.  Plow up an empty lot!  Borrow some space from anyone you can.  You may even find someone willing to lease you land at a reasonable price.  We started with not much more than our back yard, a troy-bilt hand tiller, and a hoe.  Then, find creative ways to sell your produce, to get some money coming in.  Some people like to sell produce at farmers markets, others a CSA, some to restaurants, and some even make prepared products like jellies or soaps.  Find your passion.  The key will be that you need to do this while still keeping your day job.  It takes hard work.  Save every dime you can, to reinvest in your dream.  This is how Jay and I did it.  We BOTH worked full time and farmed less than 2 acres.  Then, we lived well below our means in a tiny house, drove old cars, and never went shopping just for the fun of spending.  We tried hard to live on the farm income, and socked away our employment income, so we could eventually buy the land and equipment we wanted.  It took years, but we did it!  We bought a small farm, not a huge million dollar farm.  We probably could have qualified for some of the government subsidized or guaranteed loans to help, but in the end, I’m happy we didn’t.  

I know everyone has different attitudes and tolerances for debt.  If gutting it out, scrimping and saving until you have the cash sounds too hard, at least do your best to borrow as little as possible, and pay it off as quickly as possible.  Take my advice: Learn to find joy in the people you love and the beautiful world God made.   A small farm won’t support debt or extravagant spending.  You will need to have the fortitude to stick it out, working and saving until you can, little by little, build your dream.  Even once you buy the farm, you STILL might need to figure out another income.  Sometimes the spouse works, others work part time and farm, and some do at home jobs.  It isn’t easy, but most worthwhile things aren’t easy.  Freedom!  That is the goal.

Eat your veggies,

Robin

Share this with a friend!Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someoneShare on Google+
Posted in csa, on the farm | Tagged , , | 3 Comments