Easy Homemade Sauerkraut

I remember my ex-grandparents, Claude and Bertha Kimsey.  Maybe this needs a little explaining in our complicated world.  Claude and Bertha were the grandparents of my ex-husband, and very interesting people.  They lived in Skeenah Valley near Franklin, NC in a small cabin.  I remember Claude telling me how they made sauerkraut every fall.  Here are the basics.

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Ingredients:
A whole bunch of shredded raw cabbage (1 cabbage makes about 1 quart)
Salt
Clean Mason jars and lids
Very hot water

Directions:
Tightly pack the shredded cabbage into the Mason jars (a wooden spoon works well, to mash it in there)
Sprinkle about 1 tsp of salt in each jar
Pour in hot water until the jar is filled to the neck (water line should be higher than cabbage, throughout entire fermentation process)
Wipe off the rims of the jars and put the lids on loosely (or use cloth and rubber bands for air flow)
Let these sit and ferment at room temperature as long as you like, out of direct sunlight.

As they ferment, liquid may ooze out the top of the jar (that’s why you want the lids loose).  This is normal and not a problem.  If they are on your counter, you might want to put the jars in a pan to catch those liquids.  Claude used to just take these jars out back and put them in his shed.  It had an earth floor, so he didn’t care if they oozed.  They stayed there all winter and he went out and got a new jar whenever he wanted kraut for dinner.  The kraut flavor will intensify the longer it ferments.  Fermenting will stop if you put the jars in the fridge or out in the shed during the Franklin winter. Tightening the lid when you put it in the fridge is fine, since most of the fermenting stops when it gets cold.  Oh, key info, if you see a little white mold on the top, no worries!  This is normal.  Just skim it off before you put your kraut in the fridge. For better pictures than mine, and slightly different methods on the same basic recipe, check out this website (the kitchen).

There are plenty of good reasons to include fermented food in your diet, besides the fact that they taste good.  Probably the most important is that they are a source of beneficial probiotics that your gut needs to stay healthy.  Claude and Bertha may not have known much about gut bacteria, but our ancestors, for thousands of years, have used fermentation to preserve their foods with good reason.  It not only preserved the food, but it kept them healthy, strong, and nourished.  Thanks grandma

Eat your fermented veggies,

Robin

Easy Homemade Sauerkraut
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Prep Time
30 min
Total Time
30 min
Prep Time
30 min
Total Time
30 min
Ingredients
  1. A whole bunch of shredded raw cabbage (1 cabbage makes about 1 quart)
  2. Salt
  3. Clean Mason jars and lids
  4. Very hot water
Instructions
  1. Tightly pack the shredded cabbage into the Mason jars (a wooden spoon works well, to mash it in there)
  2. Sprinkle about 1 tsp of salt in each jar
  3. Pour in hot water until the jar is filled to the neck (water line should be higher than cabbage, throughout entire fermentation process)
  4. Wipe off the rims of the jars and put the lids on loosely (or use cloth and rubber bands for air flow)
  5. Let these sit and ferment at room temperature as long as you like, out of direct sunlight.
Notes
  1. As they ferment, liquid may ooze out the top of the jar (that’s why you want the lids loose). This is normal and not a problem. If they are on your counter, you might want to put the jars in a pan to catch those liquids. Claude used to just take these jars out back and put them in his shed. It had an earth floor, so he didn’t care if they oozed. They stayed there all winter and he went out and got a new jar whenever he wanted kraut for dinner. The kraut flavor will intensify the longer it ferments. Fermenting will stop if you put the jars in the fridge or out in the shed during the Franklin winter. Tightening the lid when you put it in the fridge is fine, since most of the fermenting stops when it gets cold. Oh, key info, if you see a little white mold on the top, no worries! This is normal. Just skim it off before you put your kraut in the fridge. For better pictures than mine, and slightly different methods on the same basic recipe, check out this website (the kitchen).
Adapted from Papa Claud
Adapted from Papa Claud
Bell's Best Berries http://bellsbestberries.com/

  Thanks grandma

Eat your fermented veggies,

Robin

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