What Do I Do With This Okra?

Okra is absolutely the vegetable of the summer.  You plant it until it gets stinking hot, and then it is ready to harvest when it is stinking hot times two, July and  August!  All of us from the south are used to eating okra, because our grandma fried it up.  Our northern friends seem to be a little stumped and maybe even a little scared.  Fear not the okra.  I’m here to help, along with a little help from my friend Organic Eater.  

Grain free fried okra from Organic Eater. This is the traditional southern way of frying okra, but with healthier ingredients.

photo credit @organiceater

photo credit @organiceater

Ingredients:

  • A bunch of okra 
  • Coconut flour
  • Almond flour
  • Salt and pepper
  • Coconut oil

Implement it.

Cut the okra into rounds that are about ½ inch thick and put them into a bowl.  Sprinkle them with coconut flour and mix in the bowl to cover each one. Then some almond flour. Put them one layer deep in a cast iron skillet with hot coconut oil.  Fry them without stirring, until they are beginning to brown on the bottom then flip/stir them in the pan and fry until the other side is turning brown.  Sprinkle with salt and pepper and serve them up!  

Roasted Okra

Ingredients:

  • Okra
  • Coconut oil
  • Curry powder
  • Salt and pepper

Implement it.

Heat oven to 400 degrees.  Toss whole okra in melted coconut oil, curry powder, and  salt and  pepper.  Spread evenly on  a cookie sheet.  Bake 15 minutes at 400 degrees.  They should be crisp tender when they are done.  If they are slimy, they have cooked too long.  

Fermented Pickled Okra

Ingredients:

Implement it.

Stuff the whole okra tightly in clean pint jars.  Add a peeled clove of garlic (or two or three).  Add a hot pepper.  Add a big sprig of fresh dill.  Make a brine of ¾ Tablespoon of salt to one cup of water.  Pour the brine over the okra, leaving about ¾ inch headspace.  Mix your starter culture as directed on the package, and add to each jar.  Put your pickle pebble or other weight on top of the okra.  Okra are hollow, so they float.  You will need to weigh them down to keep them under the brine.  Cover loosely (use your pickle pipe if you have one) and let ferment (set out on counter) about 5 days, then put in the refrigerator for 3 weeks.  Done!

Eat your veggies,

Robin

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One Response to What Do I Do With This Okra?

  1. Tina Brenize says:

    I made it this was and my kids loved it! Although I dipped them in almond milk first to help the coating “stick”. Personally I love to just eat the raw. I keep them whole and snack on them like I would carrots.

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